Burma’s Media Scene is Booming | The Irrawaddy Magazine

While the debate on media censorship reforms is an important litmus test for the future of free speech in Burma, media itself – journalism and newspapers – is not necessarily within the scope of this blog, however, there is an interesting paragraph at the end of this article which states:

“The government also has a plan to transform a semi state-owned translation organization, known as Sarpay Beikman, which publishes and translates literary works, into a public service organization. It is a tall order. The organization needs capacity building and language ability to select and translate high-quality books and publications. It will be also tasked with the drafting of a public service publishing law in the near future“.

If this is to come into effect it would be a proper – and long needed –  transformation for an organisation that began with such good ideals until co-opted by the Ministry of Information in 1963.  And the writer is correct.  To inject capacity building programmes to an organisation like this that has become inert and effectively dislocated from its original purpose is a ‘tall order‘.  Just go and see the Sarpay Beikman library on the corner of Merchant street and 38th Street and you will find a building in ruins with a gate permanently locked.

For the full article see on www.irrawaddy.org

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About Lucas Stewart

Former British Council Literature Advisor | Author of The People Elsewhere: Unbound Journey's with the Storytellers of Myanmar