Hidden Words, Hidden Worlds

In the first anthology of short stories from Myanmar published in the West, 7 of the leading contemporary Burmese language writers and 7 new voices from the ethnic regions, guide us on a sweeping journey, from the cities to the mountains, of this once pariah nation.  Written in scripts until recently censored and outlawed the anthology presents a country that goes beyond the familiar lens of isolation and dictatorship unveiling a storied and diverse landscape of people and place.  From the child imprisoned in Yangon in the south to the jaded miner of Kachin in the north, these stories, each set in a different region and era, reflect on Myanmar’s troubled past and pose questions for the future of a country undergoing a transformation of global importance.           

The anthology went through a special edition print run of 1000 copies and distributed to those who have supported writers from Myanmar over the years. A FREE e-book is available for download from the British Council website (the link will take you to their website)


Fascinating and smart, the eclectic collection of short stories found in Hidden Words Hidden Worlds: Contemporary Short Stories from Myanmar is recommended as much for its ability to serve as a primer on the ethnic diversity of Myanmar as it is for the enjoyableness of the stories.

T. F. Rhoden, Asian Review of Books


Singular not merely in its collaborative breadth, it is unprecedented: it is the first time in a half-century that such an ambitious and eclectic literary undertaking has been able to occur at all.

Martin Kovan, Mascara Literary Review


The book should serve as a first stop in English for anyone who would like to traverse the complex literary landscapes of Myanmar. Isn’t it ironic that stories from the ethnic languages, which have long been suppressed, have now been re-written in the languages of their erstwhile oppressors? As far as I am concerned, this kind of irony is most welcome.

Ko Ko Thett, Shanghai Literary Review


Myanmar is famous for its linguistic and ethnic diversity, that is often difficult to capture in a single publication. The book, however, mirrors this better than most, with writers belonging to the Mon, Karen, Kayah, Shan, Kachin, Chin and Rakhine ethnic communities …

Richard Roewer, Tea Circle