Discovering the British Council’s Library

Discovering the British Council’s Library

The British Council might be a strange place to put on a list of prominent literary landmarks in Myanmar, but its library has played an influential role in the fight against decades of literary censorship in Yangon. The British Council’s original location was in Rander House on Pansodan Street, lower block, in the 1950’s. 

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Hidden Words Reviewed by Ko Ko Thett

Hidden Words Reviewed by Ko Ko Thett

Very grateful to Ko Ko Thett for a thoughtful and detailed review of the Hidden Words, Hidden Worlds anthology:

‘The book should serve as a first stop in English for anyone who would like to traverse the complex literary landscapes of Myanmar. Isn’t it ironic that stories from the ethnic languages, which have long been suppressed, have now been re-written in the languages of their erstwhile oppressors? As far as I am concerned, this kind of irony is most welcome.’

To read the rest of the review, please visit The Shanghai Literary Review

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Review: Hidden Words Anthology

Review: Hidden Words Anthology

Many thanks to T F Rhoden and the Asia Review of Books for a very kind review of the Hidden Words, Hidden Worlds anthology.

Fascinating and smart, the eclectic collection of short stories found in Hidden Words Hidden Worlds: Contemporary Short Stories from Myanmar is recommended as much for its ability to serve as a primer on the ethnic diversity of Myanmar as it is for the enjoyableness of the stories.

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Kayah Short Story Workshop

Kayah Short Story Workshop

The penultimate Hidden Words, Hidden Worlds workshop took place in Kayah State at the beginning of June. Once a black zone where foreigners were forbidden to travel beyond the capital, Loikaw, Kayah State is home to three main ethnic groups, the Kayah, Kayan and Kayaw. It is these three groups that the workshop targeted, with 6 participants from each represented …

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Article: On Investing In Myanmar’s Writers

Any longer-term watchers of Burma will have noticed something curious over the last couple of years. After the European Union (and later the United Sates) lifted economic sanctions on the country in April 2012, Western newspapers and blogs were awash with wide-eyed stories of courageous entrepreneurs risking all in the last frontier market, making their millions over golden handshakes in hotel saloons …

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